The New Kid on the (Ad)Block: Multi-Factor Authentication for Office 365

Come again?

Don’t let the name throw you. The concept of Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) is nothing new. And it’s pretty simple when you start using it. MFA requires the password and one more verification code when signing users into Office 365. In short, it’s basically about keeping your email super secure. 

My email is secure. I’ve got a password. 

If only it were that easy. Office 365 email attacks continue to gain popularity, giving those pesky hackers access to a single email account that is then used to spear phish other accounts within and outside your organisation.

And MFA stops this from happening?

Yup.

Sounds too good to be true. Bet Microsoft have made it a pain to set up?

Not really. As technology advances, what has value is our information. Microsoft are well ahead of us all on this – and they’ve done a pretty good job of making it a fairly painless process. Each user will need to be contacted and setup individually, but that’s the only fiddly part.

Define ‘painless process’.

We configure MFA in the Microsoft admin portal, sign each user in and then follow the setup process (add mobile number, set up app password) and check everything is working and show each member of your team the ropes. Simple as.

And this will protect my business? 

Office 365 MFA is super important when it comes to limiting unlawful access to your business system. The adoption of MFA prevents various attacks designed to gain access to your data and account. It strengthens your security and means your business is one step closer to compliance.

Safety first then?

There is potential for breaches through every device, and from every person that comes into contact with your business. The threat is real. It’s an extra security boost for your business.

Makes sense. And if my business does want to implement MFA for Office 365?
We can help. Speak with one of our friendly team members today, we’ll have you up and running in no time.

Ransomware Protection: Important message on the latest attacks

Following up on our message over the weekend, we would like to provide you with further important information about the dangers of CryptoLocker, the virus which got spread around the world over the weekend.

Strange and Unwanted emails – If in doubt, don’t open and delete!
The biggest way that computers get infected, is by Email Phishing.
Phishing is a method that Virus makers use to trick you in to opening emails, visiting a website and clicking links for something that you may think is genuine.

What do these include?  Emails posing to be from PayPal, eBay, NZ or AUS Post, the Major Banks (ANZ, Westpac, ASB) etc.
Recently there has been a Cryptolocker outbreak where a lot of emails are coming through with resume as an attachment as well.

Do they have attachments?
Most of the time, they do have attachments which are mostly ZIP; DOCX; PDF or EXE files but there could be others as well.

If you receive an email and you’re unsure of its origin – DELETE IT!
It is better to be safe than sorry!
Other ways the virus can be contracted is from Illegal software download sites such as using BitTorrent.
Whilst “free” music and movies are readily available – they are prone to be infected.

What does CryptoLocker do?
The CryptoLocker virus encrypts your entire hard drive content and your computer becomes completely unusable.
Once your data is encrypted, there is virtually no way to get it back, unless you have a backup.

Regarding the latest Microsoft Updates, how can I apply?
All our managed computers are patched/updated every day at 3:00PM if the computer is online and you have not requested to be out of this schedule.
A number of these updates only finish the installation after the computer is restarted, so we are advising everyone to restart your computer at the end of today and every day.
If you missed the updates today, don’t worry our system will try to apply them again on the next day until your computer is online.

I suspect or I’ve been hit with CryptoLocker, what can I do?
The first thing to do is isolate the spread of the Virus.
Disconnect your computer from the internet by removing the Ethernet cable and/or disconnecting from Wifi.

Contact Base 2 Support straight away at 0800 14 2273 or email at [email protected]

Under no circumstances should you pay the ransom money.

Regards,
The Base 2 Team

NZ News: Popular LED name-badges open computers to hackers

A popular Christmas gift from Typo may expose computers to hackers. Hidden software installed on the device means inserting the USB accessory into your computer could leave you vulnerable to attacks, particularly from overseas hackers installing Ransomware.

Ransomware is a type of virus that essentially locks down your files until you pay the hackers a “ransom” to release them.

(original article on Newshub.)

READ MORE

“You Hacked!” – San Francisco Transit Hit with Ransomware

San Fransisco’s light rail system was compromised over the weekend and passengers were greeted with the message, “You Hacked!” at ticket kiosks. While kind of funny, this could have ended very differently.

Turns out the attackers weren’t initially after attention, however they did demand a ransom in Bitcoin, and threatened to release data if it wasn’t paid.

It doesn’t look like it’s gone any further at this stage but what ended up being an inconvenience could  have been a very expensive and embarrassing occurance.

This serves as a reminder to be vigilant for vulnerabilities in your network. As the attacker said themselves in an email, the “SFMTA network was Very Open and 2000 Server/PC infected by software!”

Source: Techcrunch – read more here

Cybercrime costs $600 billion a year

Awareness is high when it comes to Cybercrime: around 90% of Kiwis admit that they stop to think before clicking on links and attachments in emails.

Training on cyber security at work is scarily low, however, with only 17% of Kiwis saying they’ve received advice on security. The impact of this lack of training could be putting thousands of NZ businesses at risk.

Communications minister Amy Adams explains that cybercrime is now “bigger than the global drugs trade” with a cost of around $600 billion a year”.

Read More Here: IT Brief – Cybercrime Now bigger Than Global Drugs Trade

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